Category Archives: Praxis(536)

The Freedom of the Integral Yoga by August Timmermans

  The Freedom of the Integral Yoga By August Timmermans   (reprinted from Collaboration summer 2012)  Sri Aurobindo does not belong to history; he is outside and beyond history. [He] has shown that the truth does not lie in running away from earthly life but in remaining in it, to transform it, divinise it, so that the Divine can manifest here, in this physical world. 1 - The Mother   Religion and yoga are not situated on the same plane of the being, and the spiritual life can exist in its purity only if it is free from all mental…

Bernard Stiegler in Prison: Philosophy (Melete) as Practice of Self-Transformation

Inside Philosophy: Bernard Stiegler’s Prison Melt by John Douglas Macready From the Relative Absolute  In his confessional essay, “How I Became a Philosopher,” Bernard Stiegler exhibits a philosophical fidelity to his past by revealing that his philosophical vocation began in prison. He describes his time in prison as an “interruption” and “suspension” of action (“How I Became a Philosopher (HBP), in Acting Out, p. 12). Prison was like an extended Sabbath or Lent, of sorts – “an asceticism without end (HBP, p. 19).” During his five years in a French prison, Stiegler developed an “ensemble of disciplines” that he called his melete (HBP,…

Relational Ecology and the Digital Pharmakon by Bernard Stiegler

RELATIONAL ECOLOGY AND THE DIGITAL PHARMAKON by Bernard Stiegler From: The Culture Machine In French as in English, attention is a word derived from the Latin attendere, ‘to shift one’s attention to’ or ‘to take care.’ The verb form has kept this sense in English: ‘to attend a patient’ means to take care of his or her illness. In French the verb attendre has today a temporal dimension, and in general attention supposes an expectation of some kind, be it positive or negative. Faire attention, like ‘paying attention’, is in this sense a synonym of taking care (prendre soin). This is why…

Structure and Process: Integral Philosophy and Triple Transformation by Debashish Banerji

Structure and Process: Integral philosophy and triple transformation   Debashish Banerji     At the forefront of contemporary debates in religious studies is one that pits perennialism against pluralism. The idea of perennialism may be as old as homo sapiens, but its early modern origins in the west can be traced to figures like Marsilio Ficino (1433–1499), Giovanni Pico della Mirandola (1463–1494) and Agostino Steuco (1497–1548), Italian Renaissance churchmen and philosophers, who taught the consonance of religious and philosophical ideas and the continuity of these principles from Hermetic, Cabalistic and Platonic sources to Christianity. The term ‘Perennial philosophy’ arose in…

Mystical Anarchism by Simon Critchley

Read Original at: Adbusters Mystical Anarchism by Simon Critchley We are living through a long anti-1960s. The various anticapitalist experiments in communal living and collective existence that defined that period seem to us either quaintly passé, laughably unrealistic, or dangerously misguided. Having grown up and thrown off such seemingly childish ways, we now think we know better than to try to bring heaven crashing down to earth and construct concrete utopias. Despite our occasional and transient enthusiasms and Obamaisms, we are all political realists; indeed, most of us are passive nihilists and cynics. This is why we still require a…

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