Category Archives: Alternative Modernities(109)

On Alternative Modernities – Dilip Gaonkar

On Alternative Modernities Dilip Parameshwar Gaonkar To think in terms of “alternative modernities” is to admit that modernity is inescapable and to desist from speculations about the end of modernity. Born in and of the West some centuries ago under relatively specific sociohistorical conditions, modernity is now everywhere. It has arrived not suddenly but slowly, bit by bit, over the longue durée— awakened by contact; transported through commerce; administered by empires, bearing colonial inscriptions; propelled by nationalism; and now increasingly steered by global media, migration, and capi- tal. And it continues to “arrive and emerge,” as always in opportunistic fragments…

The new face of India

The new face of India Pankaj Mishra The Guardian Narendra Modi shows his inked finger after casting his vote in Ahmedabad. Photograph: Amit Dave/Reuters   In A Suitable Boy, Vikram Seth writes with affection of a placid India's first general election in 1951, and the egalitarian spirit it momentarily bestowed on an electorate deeply riven by class and caste: "the great washed and unwashed public, sceptical and gullible", but all "endowed with universal adult suffrage". India's 16th general election this month, held against a background of economic jolts and titanic corruption scandals, and tainted by the nastiest campaign yet, announces…

Capitalism: A Ghost Story by Arundati Roy

               Arundati Roy ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………... Antilla the Hun Mukesh Ambani’s 27-storey home on Altamont Road. Its bright lights, say the neighbours, have stolen the night. Capitalism: A Ghost Story OutLook India (link) Rockefeller to Mandela, Vedanta to Anna Hazare.... How long can the cardinals of corporate gospel buy up our protests? by Arundhati Roy Is it a house or a home? A temple to the new India, or a warehouse for its ghosts? Ever since Antilla arrived on Altamont Road in Mumbai, exuding mystery and quiet menace, things have not been the same. “Here we are,”…

Postcolonial Hybridity and the ‘Terrors of Technology’ Argument Posted by Asha Achuthan

Vandana Shiva Postcolonial Hybridity and the ‘Terrors of Technology’ Argument Posted by Asha Achuthan Asha Achuthan has been building towards an understanding of how the anti-technology arguments in India have been posed, in the nationalist and Marxist positions. She goes on, in this sixth post documenting her project, to look at the arguments put out by the postcolonial school, their appropriation of Marxist terminology, their stances against Marxism in responding to science and technology in general, and the implications of these arguments for other fields of inquiry. Everywhere we remain unfree and chained to technology, whether we passionately affirm or…

From the Ruins of Empire (aurobindo, anticolonialist narratives, islamic nationalism, hinduvta, in context)

Return of the native From The Hindu by Tabish Khair Pankaj Mishra’s new book, From the Ruins of Empire, which challenges Western narratives of the ‘white man’s burden’, has been raising hackles in the West and in India. Such reactions are pointers to an existing imbalance in cultural and political power, he tells Tabish Khair. Excerpts from a conversation. Pankaj Mishra is not a stranger to controversy, but his new book, From the Ruins of Empire, has been met with a barrage of criticism, implicit and explicit, from not just right-wing circles in the West but also from some British authors…

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